Quoting phrases in an essay

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The Star Trek catchphrase "Beam me up, Scotty" did not appear in that form in the original series. Other misquotations include " Just the facts, ma'am " (attributed to Jack Webb 's character of Joe Friday on Dragnet ), " Elementary, my dear Watson " (attributed to Sherlock Holmes ), " Luke, I am your father " (attributed to Darth Vader in Star Wars ), " Play it again, Sam " (attributed to Ilsa in Casablanca ), " Do you feel lucky, punk? " (attributed to Harry Callahan in Dirty Harry ) and " We don't need no stinkin' badges! " (attributed to Gold Hat in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre ). [2] [3] [4] [5]

Here is an example of what would be considered plagiarism of this passage: Example #1 Men in the Mid East have used hookahs to puff smoke for centuries. The "hookah" has been resurrected today in coffeehouses, restaurants and bars "supplanting the cigar as the tobacco fad of the moment." Reason why Example #1 is plagiarism :
Notice the writer of this passage liberally borrows words, phrases and parts of sentences from the Berestein passage (even quoting parts) but gives no indication of where the information came from. Even if the Berestein book is cited at the end of the paper in the bibliography, there is no indication that this particular passage came from the book. This information has been stolen or plagiarized from Berestein.



Here are some examples of what would be considered acceptable quotations from this passage: Example #2 According to Leslie Berestein (2003), the Middle Eastern water pipe known as the hookah recently "has been resurrected in youth-oriented coffeehouses, restaurants and bars, supplanting the cigar as the tobacco fad of the moment" (p. 10). Reason why Example #2 is acceptable :
The writer uses American Psychological Association (APA) style to cite the author Berestein by introducing the quotation with the phrase "According to Berestein" . The (10) at the end of the quoted passage indicates the page number from which the quote was taken in the Berestein book. A reference list at the end of your paper would list the complete citation for the Berestein book. Example #3 The Middle Eastern water pipe known as the hookah has recently "been resurrected in youth-oriented coffeehouses, restaurants and bars, supplanting the cigar as the tobacco fad of the moment" (Berestein 10). Reason why Example #3 is acceptable :
In this example, the writer cites the source using the Modern Language Associaton (MLA) style, with the author's name and page number cited at the end of the quote. Example #4 The Middle Eastern water pipe known as the hookah recently "has been resurrected in youth-oriented coffeehouses, restaurants and bars, supplanting the cigar as the tobacco fad of the moment." 1 Reason why Example #4 is acceptable :
Here, the writer uses Turabian style to reference the author, by marking the cited source with a footnote/endnote number. A footnote or endnote will appear later in the paper (either at the bottom of the page or the end of the paper) containing the complete citation for the author, including the page number. Notice that in each of these examples, the writer quotes Berestein's words exactly as it was given within the sentence. Whenever you quote someone else's words, you have to write them exactly as they originally appear.

Over its lengthy history, the English language has amassed the largest vocabulary of any comparable language on the planet . That’s great when it comes to picking precisely the right word for a very specific situation, but not so great when you think about the countless words that are lying ignored in the murkier corners of the dictionary, being overlooked in favor of their more familiar synonyms and equivalents. So in the interest of improving your vocabulary (and scoring a few smart points along the way) why not try ditching the familiar for the unfamiliar, and dropping one of these 25 fantastically obscure phrases into a conversation?

Quoting phrases in an essay

quoting phrases in an essay

Over its lengthy history, the English language has amassed the largest vocabulary of any comparable language on the planet . That’s great when it comes to picking precisely the right word for a very specific situation, but not so great when you think about the countless words that are lying ignored in the murkier corners of the dictionary, being overlooked in favor of their more familiar synonyms and equivalents. So in the interest of improving your vocabulary (and scoring a few smart points along the way) why not try ditching the familiar for the unfamiliar, and dropping one of these 25 fantastically obscure phrases into a conversation?

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