Great eskimo vocabulary hoax and other irreverent essays

In recent years, some linguists have turned again to ideas of linguistic relativity. Linguist Lera Boroditsky, at the University of California at Santa Cruz, has done research showing that members of the Pormpuraaw Aboriginal tribe think about time passing differently than English speakers, because their language relates it to cardinal directions instead of from left to right . Yet some still say that Arrival goes too far: “they took the hypothesis way beyond anything that is plausible,” linguist and cognitive scientist Betty Birner said of the film in an interview with  Slate .

Three centuries of  Norman Conquest  resulted in the English spelling being greatly influenced by French. English had also borrowed large numbers of words from French, keeping their French spelling. In addition, English underwent some sound changes. For example, The  Great Vowel Shift  resulted in igh  of  night  changing from a vowel followed by a velar fricative to a diphthong. The spelling of the word  night , however, did not change. These changes caused inconsistencies, like the many pronunciations of  ough (rough, through, though, plough) .  George Bernard Shaw  once joked that one could spell  fish  as * ghoti  ( gh  as in  enough ,  o  as in  women , ti as in  action ).

Great eskimo vocabulary hoax and other irreverent essays

great eskimo vocabulary hoax and other irreverent essays

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great eskimo vocabulary hoax and other irreverent essaysgreat eskimo vocabulary hoax and other irreverent essaysgreat eskimo vocabulary hoax and other irreverent essaysgreat eskimo vocabulary hoax and other irreverent essays