Alfonso cuaron essay harry potter

Alfonso Cuaron is Mexican but his second and third features were big-budget American films. I thought " Great Expectations " (1998), with Ethan Hawke , Gwyneth Paltrow and Anne Bancroft , brought a freshness and visual excitement to the updated story. I liked " A Little Princess " (1995) even more. It is clear Cuaron is a gifted director, and here he does his best work to date. Why did he return to Mexico to make it? Because he has something to say about Mexico, obviously, and also because Jack Valenti and the MPAA have made it impossible for a movie like this to be produced in America. It is a perfect illustration of the need for a workable adult rating: too mature, thoughtful and frank for the R, but not in any sense pornographic. Why do serious film people not rise up in rage and tear down the rating system that infantilizes their work? The key performance is by Maribel Verdu as Luisa. She is the engine that drives every scene she's in, as she teases, quizzes, analyzes and lectures the boys, as if impatient with the task of turning them into beings fit to associate with an adult woman. In a sense she fills the standard role of the sexy older woman, so familiar from countless Hollywood comedies, but her character is so much more than that--wiser, sexier, more complex, happier, sadder. It is true, as some critics have observed, that "Y Tu Mama" is one of those movies where "after that summer, nothing would ever be the same again." Yes, but it redefines "nothing."

French New Wave films like “Breathless” oozed with sexuality and perfected the art of cool, while in Italy, Fellini crafted one of the greatest films of all time with “8 1/2.” In the ., Roman Polanski and Alfred Hitchcock elevated horror to iconic and sophisticated new heights with “Psycho” and “Rosemary’s Baby.” Clint Eastwood reinvented the Western genre, “Barbarella” proved that sex sells and plot can be an afterthought, and “Lolita” took sexuality to dangerous and taboo territory.

Back to Square One: Revisiting the Classics In its postmodern fascination with the politics of representation, (1) contemporary cinema has established a fruitful dialogue with the so-called "canonical" literature of the past. Contemporary audiences might consider ourselves lucky: we are offered not only critically productive angles of vision of certain classics but, equally importantly, pleasure. A pleasure which is manifold; on the one hand, we are allowed to re-visit a multiplicity of texts that some of us have experienced through the intimacy of reading; on the other, we are given the opportunity to inscribe our own reading in an ongoing cultural dialogue, sharing it with that of the director, the critics, the audiences. Further, there is the mere (scopophilic) enjoyment of the multiple semiotic possibilities which representation offers. Still further, we are allowed to reflect on the ways in which film adaptations of classic novels might become postmodern artefacts where copies become originals and originals become copies, thus not only blurring the distinction between these two categories, but effectively establishing a cultural exchange which successfully brings the classic back to our days. From Shakespeare to Jane Austen, . Forster, or Virginia Woolf, what critic Harold Bloom described as 'the Western canon' (1994) has been visually represented in recent decades (the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s have been particularly prolific in this respect). The work of one of the most popular novelists of the nineteenth century, Charles Dickens, could not remain silent in the fin-de-siecle dialogical interchange. (2)

So compassion and sincerity combine with dramatic sloppiness or the desire to show off. Some moments strike deeply, too many are merely glancing blows. Technical marvels compete with one another. Stories are designed to the hilt, perhaps over-designed, but the ideas are not particularly strong. The writers and directors are satisfied when they’ve hit upon one or two insights and leave it at that. Action scenes can be brilliantly done, yet when the pace lets up, there’s not too much there. Dialogue about ideas is not expressively or convincingly done. So the action has to be cranked up again, because the filmmakers have only a limited number of things to say.

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Alfonso cuaron essay harry potter

alfonso cuaron essay harry potter

So compassion and sincerity combine with dramatic sloppiness or the desire to show off. Some moments strike deeply, too many are merely glancing blows. Technical marvels compete with one another. Stories are designed to the hilt, perhaps over-designed, but the ideas are not particularly strong. The writers and directors are satisfied when they’ve hit upon one or two insights and leave it at that. Action scenes can be brilliantly done, yet when the pace lets up, there’s not too much there. Dialogue about ideas is not expressively or convincingly done. So the action has to be cranked up again, because the filmmakers have only a limited number of things to say.

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